The 3 Best Bluetooth VR Gaming Controllers 2020 Latest Updated Review

The 3 Best Bluetooth VR Gaming Controllers 2020 Latest Updated Review

Virtual Reality is a fascinating way to travel using nothing more than the power of technology

Overview

Virtual Reality is a fascinating way to travel using nothing more than the power of technology.

With a headset and motion tracking, VR lets you look around a virtual space as if you’re actually there, or play a game like you’re really in it.

It’s been gaining traction in recent years thanks to some very compelling games and experiences, though it still seems very much in a state of flux, with headsets coming and going fairly rapidly.

We’re tracking the best of what’s currently on the market here.

Oculus Quest 2


The Oculus Rift was the first big name in the current wave of VR, and Oculus is still a major player in the category.

It’s bowing out of the dedicated tethered VR headset, though, discontinuing the Rift S in favor of focusing entirely on the standalone Quest 2.

This doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy PC VR on the company’s new headset; you’ll just need to get an accessory cable for it.

The Oculus Quest 2 is a $300 standalone VR headset powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 865, a considerable upgrade in power over the original Quest and its Snapdragon 835.

It offers a comprehensive VR experience in a single package with no wires needed (except to charge the headset), and currently provides the highest resolution of any consumer VR headset at 1,920 by 1,832 per eye.

It has two motion controls for full 6DOF head and hand motion tracking, and offers a surprisingly robust library of VR software in its onboard store.

This doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy tethered VR with the Quest 2, though.

The $79 Oculus Link cable is a five-meter USB-C cable that lets you connect the Quest 2 to your PC and use it just like the tethered Rift S to play PC-specific VR games like Half-Life: Alyx.

The cable is expensive, but considering the Quest 2 is $100 less than the original Quest, it still comes out ahead in value even after adding the accessory.

Sony PlayStation VR

The PlayStation VR is compelling thanks to Sony backing development for it and the affordability and availability of the PlayStation 4 compared with gaming PCs.

All you need is the headset, a PlayStation 4, and a PlayStation Camera (now included with most PlayStation VR bundles).

There are some excellent games on PS VR like Moss, Rez Infinite, Until Dawn: Rush of Blood, and Five Nights at Freddie’s: Help Wanted.

Many PlayStation VR games work with the DualShock 4, so you don’t even need motion controls.

However, those motion controls are where the PlayStation VR lags behind; the headset still uses the PlayStation Move wands from the PlayStation 3 era, and they aren’t nearly as capable or comfortable as the Oculus Touch controllers.

They’re also expensive, and not always included in PlayStation VR bundles.

It appears that the PlayStation VR will work with the upcoming PlayStation 5. Sony hasn’t announced any new VR hardware, though the PS5 will have a new camera accessory that will presumably enable PS VR.

HTC Vive Cosmos

HTC’s Vive Cosmos is the upgraded version of the Vive headset, boasting a higher resolution and replacing the external base stations with outward-facing cameras for motion tracking.

It’s a comprehensive package for whole-room VR, but at $699, it’s quite expensive compared with the VR Gaming Controllers

For even better motion tracking, the Vive Cosmos Elite brings back external base stations to augment how it follows your head and motion controllers, though it’s pricier at $899.

The Vive Cosmos works with SteamVR just like the Oculus Quest 2, and has its own VR software store in the form of Viveport.

Viveport also offers the Viveport Infinity membership that provides unlimited access to VR experiences through a subscription service instead of a la carte software purchases.

Valve Index

It costs $999 if you buy everything you need for it to work VR Gaming Controllers

You can save some money by reusing your HTC Vive base stations, cutting the price down to $749, or get only the headset (and provide your own motion controllers and base stations) for $499.

Those are hard prices to swallow, even if the Index sports a notably higher 120Hz refresh rate than most of its competitors , and the controllers feature an advanced grip system for more natural, precise interaction.

We have yet to test the Valve Index.

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